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Mardi Tindal's picture

Mardi Tindal

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Occupy Hope

Like so many Canadian celebrities, it had to go make it big in the United States before it could come back to Canada and be welcomed. I’m talking about the Occupy Wall Street movement, which was born in Vancouver at Adbusters magazine
 

As the movement has spread across the United States and around the world before finally ‘coming home’ to cities in Canada, people of the United Church have become involved by taking part in the protests, visiting the occupied sites, and providing material and spiritual support.


Interfaith collaboration and “protest chaplains” – providing pastoral care to protesters at the scene of the protests – have been an important part of the occupy movement.  I have just spoken by phone with the Rev. Alexa Gilmour of Windermere United Church in Toronto. Alexa is among those offering pastoral support to the protesters gathered at St. James Park where approximately 200 souls are encamped. I am grateful that Alexa feels that she has the support of her congregational members and her moderator to follow the call to be there – not only for the protesters but for others as well, including security staff and police. As Alexa says, “Truly, we’re a 100% community.” And as Parker Palmer says, one of our ‘habits of the heart’ must be to understand that we are all in this together.


These actions are deeply rooted in the tradition of the United Church which as early as 1934, in the midst of the Depression, called members and ministers to "to study and understand the existing social order...to arouse the Christian conscience when injustice and intolerable conditions are discovered." The church's 2006 report, Living Faithfully in the Midst of Empire, identifies national and global inequalities that threaten life. Indeed the richest 10 percent of adults in the world own 85 percent of global household wealth. This inequality challenges the faith we profess as followers of Jesus.


The Occupy movement has prompted strong reactions.  The New York Times characterized the outrage against the peaceful protests as “remarkably hysterical.” 

 

Much has been made of the fact that the Occupy movement, which describes itself as "a leaderless resistance movement with people of many colours, genders, and political persuasions," appears to have no coherent goals. What is it resisting? Where does it want to go?


For my part, I see the movement as both a search for hope and a statement of hope, made by people who have come to believe that something is deeply wrong in the staggering inequality of our current society. I don’t think it is required of anyone to provide a complete, documented solution before they’re allowed to express concern. To the contrary, recognizing that “something is not right” is the essential first step toward defining change.


The United Church's 1997 statement, Mending the World, encourages us "to work in partnership with all who seek the health and well-being of the whole creation." As such, United Church members who wish to learn more about the movement should feel encouraged to do so. Visit occupy sites and learn first hand about the concerns of those involved.


If you find people who are seeking justice and the promise of abundant life for all, then consider how you can help.


I write these words having just taken the train from Chatham to Windsor, near the end of my official visits to Hamilton and London conferences. I’m deeply moved by all that I’ve seen of United Church members and leaders who are actively participating in on-the-ground community efforts to seek justice and participate in God’s healing and mending work toward abundant life for all. The occupy movement is yet another expression of our hope.

Perhaps it could be said that our Christian hope occupies us as much as we occupy it.


Links to more:

To find or organize an event in your area:
www.occupytogether.org/

Interfaith Prayer Service
http://www.iwj.org/template/index.cfm

Resources
http://www.united-church.ca/getinvolved/covenanting
http://www.united-church.ca/economic/globalization

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CelticRob's picture

CelticRob

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Greetings from Occupy Saskaton!

This United Church Minister (and a friend who is an Anglican priest) are the two clergy who have been involved in Occupy Saskatoon (as far as I know). I've been involved in the process here in Saskatoon from square one (meaning the initial organization meeting). We're also using the kitchen of a United Church for food preparation.

The Occupy movement is raising profound ethical questions, which are entirely in keeping with some of Jesus' stories. What does it mean to be in community? What is our relationship with our money? What is our relationship with other people around us, whether the poor, or the 1%? 

I have no idea where this well end. But, from my persepctive, we are beginning a whole new way of thinking about our common humanity, in some 1,911 communities around the world.

spirit wind 7's picture

spirit wind 7

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I was wondering when you were going to speak.  I felt this action would be close to your heart.  It has reached deeply into many hearts and souls.

 

Might this be an action that we might as the UCC could take up, or be part of in visible way?

 

I agree that there is a clear statement and that we don't not have to have written solutions to speak loud and clear on anything.  That is to put off people and the media has lead that statement.  

 

Our government has complied with many things that have incurred this need to gather and tell them we are very much aware of the results of the actions they are doing and supporting that do bring us all down.  It puts us all at risk.

 

There is also a gathering behind us in the park which has not been on TV that I have seen, but it was announced in church. We look on the park and I saw tents.  That's how some media are not speaking, or not paying attention.  But is it their idea, or are they being told what to do???  The media has a lot of  sway.  Good idea to take it lightly.

 

All power to peacefully telling the power straight out that the People of the lands have had enough of their greed to last for eons.  Make the path even and straight, or let someone else who will, do it.

 

Thanks for being on board, Mardi.

 

 

 

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femmemomma

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Hi Mardi, thanks for lending us your support!

I am one of the  protest chaplains alongside Alexa and it has been a transformational part of my growth in the church for sure. 

What amazed me most the first day I was out there was that after the prayer vigil we organised, I spent some time walking around in the rain (it was Wednesday, the night of the big storm) and people couldn't wait to talk to me and immediately share their faith stories! There's no way I could have expected people's reactions. It made me realise the deep need for spiritual connection and support that was needed. I was asked several times if I could camp out with them permanently.

I would encourage anyone who is able to go down to their local occupy movement and be visible as church folk. You will meet some incredible people that's for sure! And if there is anyone in Toronto who wants to follow what the protest chaplains are doing, you can check out our facebook page.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Occupy-Toronto-Protest-Chaplains/29215180...

We are also having a prayer vigil this Wednesday.

https://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=155117001250604

 

Mardi Tindal's picture

Mardi Tindal

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Many thanks for these comments!

I've been in Ottawa since last evening, with Canadian Interfaith Leaders' events re: our Call to Action on Climate Justice...

... and last night a local Anglican made a point of asking me to let any clergy in the Ottawa area know that anyone who is able to visit the local occupy movement  here in Confederation Park, to add spiritual/moral support as church folk, would be very welcome.

I'm simply lifting up what you've already said, femmemomma, i.e.  "I would encourage anyone who is able to go down to their local occupy movement and be visible as church folk."

 

 

cknk's picture

cknk

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For the past week I have been going daily to Occupy Sudbury and I have to say, it seems so amazing. Occupy Sudbury is very small. A lot of the time there's about ten people there, but its not the same ten people. There are lots of people coming by for a while. I take my children there and I try to talk to whomever I can. Everyone has a story.

Occupy Sudbury is, in part, becoming an outreach project to the homeless. We feed anyone who wants food, and there's a tent full of clothes anyone can take from. Last night we had someone down from the health department to do a presentation on STDs and someone else teaching a free Tae Kwon Doe class. Today there will be a native healing circle.

I have never seen such caring. I have never seen people so willing to do anything they can for other people.

RevLGKing's picture

RevLGKing

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One commentator on the article below, suggested that it is about time that all the centres of institutional wealth--the kind which seek only to hold on to their wealth, power and to serve only themselves--be "occupied".

And let us, who claim membership in one of the churches, not hesitate to remind ourselves and fellow church members that our primary role is one of service, not one of wealth and power.   

In my opinion, instead of offering the threat of OCCUPATION--suggestive of violence--would it not be better to ask for the opportunity to have a dialogue about who we are and what we have in mind, that we HOPE will benefit all concerned?

For example: We all need to know about the value of using www.torontodollar.com

==================

With the above in mind, let us take a look at the following. It is the latest rant, made in the National Post, by the well known NFLDR, Rex Murphy.

Forget Wall Street: Occupy Hollywood

You hear it in every little encampment in every city that has a franchise in the current “Occupy” protests: The righteous tent-and-yurt people are against “greed.”

 

They see greed as the demonic dynamo of a rapacious capitalism (and its maidservant, “income inequality”). And what represents greed better than mega-payoffs, dazzling bonuses and stock options, for very little actual work, and sometimes even when performance is far below par? It is only to be expected that the high-flying brokers, bankers and CEOs that cluster like flies around the honey pots of Wall Street, who waltz off with payoffs that would shame a Croesus, are the occupiers’ main targets.

 

I suggest, however, that by limiting their wrath to the sharks and swine of Wall Street, they are, if I may say, shortchanging themselves. There are many venues and theatres of greed other than the stock market. And they are tenanted by agents of ferocity and appetite equal to any gold-lusting shill at an investment bank. Greed has many McMansions, and they are all worth the “occupying.”

 

Has anyone, for example, apart from her jilted “husband,” thought of occupying … Kim Kardashian?

 

Of course, I mean “occupy” purely in its fashionable protest sense. Occupy her, not for being even more formidably vulgar and avaricious than Paris Hilton, a truly Olympic distinction. No — occupy her for running a tawdry TV spectacle called (hand over mouth, please) Kim’s Fairytale Wedding: A Kardashian Event, selling the rights, drowning in the publicity and then announcing the “divorce” a mere 72 days into the staged connubial farce.

 

Various reports — one from the New York Post, for instance — put the revenues from this mockery, the flow of cash to Kardashian Inc., at something over $17-million. Is it possible — yes I’m reverting to the great cliché without the smack of an apology — that we live in a world where children starve for want of a dime a day, while this bloated, vacuous ego gets to rake in $17-million for a gaudy, inane travesty?

 

If greed’s the target, and vulgarity a bonus, then Occupy Kim Kardashian. Occupy the whole dam clan of Khardashians for their shameless cupidity.

 

Alas, Kim and her clan are only emblems of a wider, deeper and equally deplorable phenomenon. Want to really talk excess rewards and ridiculous spending? Go find James Cameron. Avatar, the puerile 3-D eco-fairytale, was his latest and most expensive cinematic trinket, approaching $500-million to make, according to some estimates. Half a billion dollars — that’s billion with a B — to make a three-hour distraction. Occupy James Cameron for epic excess and pointless expenditure in a world of want and woe.

 

Speaking of which, is there not something appalling about paying $30-million to Jim Carrey to shriek at a camera while screwing up his face for a couple of days? Or $20-million to Cameron Diaz to chirp and smile for an hour. Or millions to Megan Fox for wearing tight jeans. Why then is there not an Occupy Hollywood movement twice as furious and twice as righteous as the Wall Street one?

 

Occupy the rap-music industry. This is greed on steroids. Is Fiddy Cent really worth millions for his thugish persona? And occupy Lady Gaga while you’re at it.

 

The sphere of outrages, as you can see, is potentially limitless: pseudo-literature, art auctions, sports stars.

 

Limiting these delightful protests to the banal and obvious target of Wall Street is a failure of imagination and initiative. Greed has more high class venues and more outrageous exemplars by far. So there is no need to stick around in a cold park, next to an overcrowded yurt, and a mere mini-riot away from the police nightstick. Head off to Hollywood, or wherever bad music is made, gape at anything called Reality TV — greed, excess, and inequity leprously spot the entire landscape.

==========================

National Post

Rex Murphy offers commentary weekly on CBC TV’s The National, and is host of CBC Radio’s Cross Country Checkup.

RevLGKing's picture

RevLGKing

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THE ROLE OF THE MONEYCHANGERS MENTIONED IN THE BIBLE--THEY WERE NOT WHAT TODAY WE CALL MONEY EXCHANGERS.

 

But the honest ones had to be about  HONEST WEIGHTS, MEASURES and making sure the pure and interest-free TEMPLE CURRENCY was available.

 

In John 2:16, when Jesus referred to the Temple as “my Father’s house”,  he was obviously not pleased with what it had become. No wonder that he lament about what it had become. Instead of a "house of prayer for the people of all nations" but had been turned into a "hideout of thieves".

 

This is the only account of Jesus using physical force in any of the Gospels. The narrative occurs near the end of the Synoptic Gospels (at Mark 11:15–19, 11:27–33, Matthew 21:12–17, 21:23–27 and Luke 19:45–48, 20:1–8) and near the start in the Gospel of John (at John 2:13–16). Some scholars believe that these refer to two separate incidents, given that the Gospel of John includes more than one passover.

 

The following is my conjecture as to their role. No mention of  this is found in the regular Bible commentaries. But check out the following book. It is a ground-breaking study of the economic functions of the Jerusalem temple by  Marty E. Stevens, who worked for fifteen years as a Certified Public Accountant prior to getting a Ph.D. in Old Testament.

TEMPLES, TITHES AND TAXES: The Temple and the Economic Life of Ancient Israel

Marty E. Stevens holds a PhD in Old Testament from Union Theological Seminary and Presbyterian School of Christian Education. Prior to embarking on an academic career, she worked for fifteen years as a CPA in the US, Canada, and Europe. She teaches Biblical Studies at the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg.

 

In her study she tells us that the temple in Jerusalem was both the center of ancient Israel's religious life and also the economic center for the nation.

 

It also tells us that the temple acted as the central bank, the internal revenue collector, the source of loans, and it was even the debt collector for the people of ancient Israel.

 

All ancient temple-systems throughout the ancient Near East, including those of Rome and Athens, served, not just as centres for religious functions, they served the business needs of  the government and commerce. This fascinating book opens new avenues for understanding the Jerusalem temple and its impact on Israelite society.

==============================================================

The primary role of the moneychangers, providing they were honest, was to make sure that the Temple coins were pure ones. Yes, not all moneychangers were thieves. And do not confuse moneychanging with what we, today, call money exchanging. For example, the changing, for a fee, of Canadian paper dollars into American ones. This poses the questions: Is money exchanging a totally honest business? Anyone an expert on the foreign exchange markets?

 

BTW, no doubt Matthew, a tax gatherer, was also a moneychanger.  Knowing his reputation Jesus led to Jesus chosing him as a disciple. Also, it was his job, as a tax collector, to make sure that all the Gentile coins that went through his hands and came into the Temple tax system were not debased, but made of pure gold, silver, and bronze. We can assume that he had the power to order that coins be melted down, that is, rendered and checked for purity. Render is a term used to mean to extract and to clarify by melting .

 

In all this discussion I think it is safe to assume that the Romans, Greeks, other Gentiles and the Jews all had their share of cheat? History records that by the fall of the Roman Empire, a Roman gold coin--minted, we are told. in the temple of Juno Moneta (from which we get our word 'money'), the wife of Jupiter--was simply lead dipped in gold. This of course caused massive inflation--one of the causes of the fall of Rome.

 

=====================

THE BIBLE AND THE QUESTION OF INTEREST--NOT TO BE CONFUSED WITH DIVIDEND

The Hebrew for 'interest' is NESHEK. It means to take a bite

=======================================================================

Read what Deuteronomy 15 says about THE SEVENTH-YEAR and the canceling of debt. Other passages: Ezekiel 18:13-15; Nehemiah 5:6-13 and Psalm 15:5 to name a few.

Interestingly, in ancient Jerusalem devout Jews, like Jesus, his family and disciples, no doubt used the pure Temple money, which, when loaned to fellow Jews, was interest-free. It was a CCC--that is, it was a local and complementary community currency in the form of metal coins. Keep in mind that all coins, Temple and foreign coins went by weight, not by denomination--numbers on the coins. An ounce was an ounce, right? And, on this basis, they circulated as did Gentile coins.

But was it an honest system?

The Temple coins bore the Temple stamp--palm trees & fruit--not the image of pagan gods like that of the Roman emperors. Such images were abhorrent to pious Jews. As I said, devout Jews expected that Temple coins would not be debased, like many foreign coins were.

Now use your imagination: Just like today, there were greedy people with criminal minds who found ways to beat the system. As I said above, the moneychangers were suppose to check the purity of foreign coins. How? Of course they were supposed to melt it down--that is, render it--and make sure it was pure. But did they?

In addition, when they found pure metals, did they make sure it stayed that way? Just think of the temptation to debase the good coins and make more debased coins in the process. Does this not remind us of toxic and sub-prime mortgages and the like?

 

IT WAS ALL ABOUT HONEST WEIGHTS AND MEASURES
 

Take the time to go behind the story as to why Jesus--on the day Christians call Palm Sunday--turned over the tables of the cheating moneychangers--those who he called thieves--and you will get some understanding as to why he was arrested by the henchmen of the greedy, the rich and the shameless. Though the corruption around the sacrificial offering of animals was involved in causing his righteous anger, the bigger issue, in my opinion, had to do with corrupt moneychangers.


Of course, this is why they wanted to get rid of him. He blew the whistle on their scam, didn't he? And it cost him his life. Talk about wisdom, and courage! And why is this not mentioned in our Bible commentaries? If anyone finds a commentary where this is brought out, let me know.

HOW MONEY WAS INFLATED IN ANCIENT TIMES--before paper money

===============================================

For details check out:

http://mises.org/daily/3663

Here are a few quotes, in summary:

==========

AS IT IS, TODAY, SO IT WAS

Monetary, fiscal, military, political, and economic issues are all very much intertwined. And they are all so intertwined because any state normally seeks to monopolize the supply of money within its own territory.

 

Monetary policy therefore always serves, even if it serves badly, the perceived needs of the rulers of the state. If it also happens to enhance the prosperity and progress of the masses of the people, that is a secondary benefit; but its first aim is to serve the needs of the rulers, not the ruled. This point is central, I believe, to an understanding of the course of monetary policy in the late Roman Empire.

 

We may begin by looking at the mentality of the rulers of the Roman Empire, beginning at the end of the 2nd century AD and looking through to the end of the 3rd century AD. Roman historians refer to this period as the "Crisis of the 3rd Century." And the reason is that the problems of the Roman society in that period were so profound, so enormous, that Roman society emerged from the 3rd century very different in almost all ways from what it had been in the 1st and 2nd centuries.

 

To look at the mentality of the Roman emperors, we can look just at the advice that the Emperor Septimius Severus gave to his two sons, Caracalla and Geta. This is supposed to be his final words to his heirs. He said, "live in harmony; enrich the troops; ignore everyone else." Now, there is a monetary policy to be marveled at!

 

Caracalla did not adhere to the first part of that advice; in fact, one of his first acts was to murder his brother. But as for enriching the troops, he took that so seriously to heart that his mother remonstrated with him and urged him to be more moderate and to restrain his increasing military expenditures and burdensome new taxes.

 

He responded by saying there was no longer any revenue, just or unjust, to be found. But not to worry, "for as long as we have this," he insisted, pointing to his sword, "we shall not run short of money."

==========

So much more could be added to this. But I will conclude with the following question and offer a suggestion:

 

Now, in modern time that we use a paper-money system: Is there a way those willing to be of service get their fair share of federal money,  legally, be transform it into Toronto dollars and use it as an into interest-free community currency.

 

Absolutely, the answer is: Yes! Now, take a close look at how the TD system does it: http://www.torontodollar.com

 

TORONTO DOLLARS ARE JUST AS LEGAL AS ARE CANADIAN TIRE DOLLARS

Ask any of TD system leaders--members of the Family Life Foundation are more than glad to help--for details as to how it works and how every church can use such a system to create the kind of community where we serve one another, pay one another and thus create a local economy.

 

Like Temple money of Jesus' day,  the TD dollar stays in place in the community. In cooperation with our federal currency and local banks it can be used  to serve the community without the threat of inflation.

 

ONE OF THE FIRST SPONSORS OF THE TORONTO DOLLAR WAS THE FAMILY LIFE FOUNDATION (founded in 1973, at Willowdale UC.) 

http://www.flfcanada.com   The TD system is still supported by the FLF.

I was present at the historic event at the St. Lawrence Market. With the approval of Mayor Mel Lastman, who purchased the first dollars, and Toronto Council, it was put into place in october of 1998.

 

 

RevLGKing's picture

RevLGKing

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THE STORY OF PAPER MONEY

Historians write that the banknote was first developed in China starting in the 7th century. Its roots were in merchant receipts of deposit during the Tang Dynasty (618–907). During the Yuan Dynasty, banknotes were adopted by the Mongol Empire. In Europe, the concept of banknotes was first introduced during the 14th century, with proper banknotes not appearing until the 17th century.  For details check out 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paper_money

===========================

Germany won't budge on 'lender of last resort'

Children use bundles of Deutschmarks as building blocks during the Weimar Republic in Germany.

Germany children, not long before Hitler came to power,  using bundles of money as buiding blocks .

========================================

The following is based on information I found in a recent article (November 11, 2011) in the National Post, by Stephen Brown in Berlin.

 

GERMANY'S  FEAR OF INFLATION SINCE THE 1920'S    

To understand why to this day, all hardworking Germans fear inflation, you can rifle through the numismatic counters at flea markets and tourist stalls in Berlin, where curious bank notes from the 1920s in denominations of hundreds of billions and even trillions of marks go for a few euros.

 

THIS MAKES NO SENSE, TO ME

This prompts me to ask: Were some of the political and financial leaders of Germany in the first half of the Twentieth Century criminally insane?

 

This galloping inflation, when prices doubled every day, resulted from the efforts of the Reichsbank, Germany's central bank until 1945, to 'monetize' government debts swollen by reparations for the First World War by creating money to buy them up.

 

By late 1923, a litre of milk cost 26-billion marks and a loaf of bread 105-billion. Shopping involved carting piles of cash around in wheelbarrows and baskets in such quantities that it had to be weighed on scales rather than counted by shopkeepers.

 

Grainy photos from the time show people papering their walls with the currency and children using bundles of cash as building blocks. The chaos contributed to the rise of Adolf Hitler, who first tried to take power in Munich's "Beer Hall Putsch" at the height of hyperinflation in 1923.

 

"It is deeply embedded in the German psyche," said Prof. Neumann, emeritus economics professor at Bonn University.

 

He sees parallels between the Reichsbank's determination to save Germany from its war debt and the ECB tackling the euro crisis via much-criticized purchases of Greek and Italian debt.

 

The current successor to the Reichsbank (Reich--State), the Bundesbank (Bundes--Band, League, Society), nicknamed the Buba, was set up in Frankfurt in 1957 as a fiercely independent central bank whose core task was to guard against inflation.

 

WE NEED TO BEWARE: ANOTHER NAME FOR INFLATION IS "STEALING"

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RevLGKing

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The Wisdom of Thomas Jefferson

 

John F. Kennedy once held a dinner in the white House for a group of the brightest minds in the nation at that time. At this dinner he made the following statement about Thomas Jefferson:

 

"This is perhaps the assembly of the most intelligence ever to gather at one time in the White House with the exception of when Thomas Jefferson dined alone."

====================

Here is what Jefferson once said about the danger of building large cities:

"When we get piled upon one another in large cities, as in Europe, we shall become as corrupt as is Europe ." -- Thomas Jefferson

 

ABOUT DEMOCRACY

"Democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not."

 

"It is incumbent on every generation to pay its own debts as it goes. A principle which if acted on would save one-half the wars of the world."

 

"I predict future happiness for Americans, if we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them."

 

 

"My reading of history convinces me that most bad government results from too much government."

 

THE RIGHT TO BEAR ARMS

"No free man shall ever be debarred the use of arms."

 

"The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government."

 

"The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants."

 

"To compel a man to subsidize with his taxes the propagation of ideas which he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical."

 

ABOUT BANKING. IN 1802 HE SAID:

"I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies.

 

If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency, first by inflation, then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around the banks will deprive the people of all property - until their children wake-up homeless on the continent their fathers conquered."

 

=============================

Thomas Jefferson was a very remarkable man who started learning very early in life and never stopped.

At 5, began studying under his cousin's tutor.

At 9, studied Latin, Greek and French.

At 14, studied classical literature and additional languages.

At 16, entered the College of William and Mary.

At 19, studied Law for 5 years starting under George Wythe.

At 23, started his own law practice.

At 25, was elected to the Virginia House of Burgesses.

At 31, wrote the widely circulated "Summary View of the Rights of British America” and retired from his law practice.

At 32, was a Delegate to the Second Continental Congress.

At 33, wrote the Declaration of Independence.

At 33, took three years to revise Virginia?s legal code and wrote a Public Education bill and a statute for Religious Freedom.

At 36, was elected the second Governor of Virginia succeeding Patrick Henry.

At 40, served in Congress for two years.

At 41, was the American minister to France and negotiated commercial treaties with European nations along with Ben Franklin and John Adams.

At 46, served as the first Secretary of State under George Washington.

At 53, served as Vice President and was elected president of the American Philosophical Society.

At 55, drafted the Kentucky Resolutions and became the active head of Republican Party.

At 57, was elected the third president of the United States .

At 60, obtained the Louisiana Purchase doubling the nation's size.

At 61, was elected to a second term as President.

At 65, retired to Monticello .

At 80, helped President Monroe shape the Monroe Doctrine.

At 81, almost single-handedly created the University of Virginia and served as its first president.

 

At 83, died on the 50th anniversary of the Signing of the Declaration of Independence along with John Adams

Thomas Jefferson knew because he himself studied the previous failed attempts at government. He understood actual history, the nature of God, his laws and the nature of man. That happens to be way more than what most understand today. Jefferson really knew his stuff. A voice from the past to lead us in the future.

 

 

RevLGKing's picture

RevLGKing

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Without agreeing with all that he said, we could learn a lot from

The Wisdom of Thomas Jefferson

 

John F. Kennedy once held a dinner in the white House for a group of the brightest minds in the nation at that time. At this dinner he made the following statement about Thomas Jefferson:

 

"This is perhaps the assembly of the most intelligence ever to gather at one time in the White House with the exception of when Thomas Jefferson dined alone."

====================

Here is what Jefferson once said about the danger of building large cities:

"When we get piled upon one another in large cities, as in Europe, we shall become as corrupt as is Europe ." -- Thomas Jefferson

 

ABOUT DEMOCRACY

"Democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not."

 

"It is incumbent on every generation to pay its own debts as it goes. A principle which if acted on would save one-half the wars of the world."

 

"I predict future happiness for Americans, if we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them."

 

 

"My reading of history convinces me that most bad government results from too much government."

 

THE RIGHT TO BEAR ARMS

"No free man shall ever be debarred the use of arms."

 

"The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government."

 

"The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants."

 

"To compel a man to subsidize with his taxes the propagation of ideas which he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical."

 

ABOUT BANKING. IN 1802 HE SAID:

"I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies.

 

If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency, first by inflation, then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around the banks will deprive the people of all property - until their children wake-up homeless on the continent their fathers conquered."

 

=============================

Thomas Jefferson was a very remarkable man who started learning very early in life and never stopped.

At 5, began studying under his cousin's tutor.

At 9, studied Latin, Greek and French.

At 14, studied classical literature and additional languages.

At 16, entered the College of William and Mary.

At 19, studied Law for 5 years starting under George Wythe.

At 23, started his own law practice.

At 25, was elected to the Virginia House of Burgesses.

At 31, wrote the widely circulated "Summary View of the Rights of British America” and retired from his law practice.

At 32, was a Delegate to the Second Continental Congress.

At 33, wrote the Declaration of Independence.

At 33, took three years to revise Virginia?s legal code and wrote a Public Education bill and a statute for Religious Freedom.

At 36, was elected the second Governor of Virginia succeeding Patrick Henry.

At 40, served in Congress for two years.

At 41, was the American minister to France and negotiated commercial treaties with European nations along with Ben Franklin and John Adams.

At 46, served as the first Secretary of State under George Washington.

At 53, served as Vice President and was elected president of the American Philosophical Society.

At 55, drafted the Kentucky Resolutions and became the active head of Republican Party.

At 57, was elected the third president of the United States .

At 60, obtained the Louisiana Purchase doubling the nation's size.

At 61, was elected to a second term as President.

At 65, retired to Monticello .

At 80, helped President Monroe shape the Monroe Doctrine.

At 81, almost single-handedly created the University of Virginia and served as its first president.

 

At 83, died on the 50th anniversary of the Signing of the Declaration of Independence along with John Adams

Thomas Jefferson knew because he himself studied the previous failed attempts at government. He understood actual history, the nature of God, his laws and the nature of man. That happens to be way more than what most understand today. Jefferson really knew his stuff. A voice from the past to lead us in the future.