busymom's picture

busymom

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Please think twice before you put on fragrance

Hi Wondercafe Friends,

Not wanting to start a big debate.  Just wanting to put this request out there.

 

Please, before applying fragrance, consider who you might run into after you are smelling wonderful.  While many people appreciate fragrance, and think it's appealing, there are many many people whose health is compromised by certain scents.  You could trigger an asthma attack that is life threatening for someone.

 

Today at work a volunteer who was sitting in the same office space as I was wearing a very strong fragrance.  The effect it had on my asthma was almost immediate.  This woman is a lovely person, and when approached by the volunteer co-ordinator, she was sympathetic and understanding.  She agreed to be more careful about wearing fragrance in the future.  However, the fragrance lingered and my asthma was out of control.  I took my rescue inhalers, but was still struggling.  Then when it was time to go home I discovered that her coat had been place on the same hook as my coat, so my coat was scented with the fragrance.  Needless to say it was a horrible drive home.  I took my coat off in the vehicle, but still the fragrance was irritating me.

 

I have been home for 4 hours, and am just now starting to feel better.  (I've had shortness of breath, headache and feel exhausted). 

 

A seemingly innocent act of applying fragrance can be very harmful to others.  Please think twice before applying fragrance and going out in public.

 

ps.  I have requested that my workplace be a fragrance free building, but no such luck.  Our CEO has instructed me to leave an area if my asthma is triggered by fragrance, but feels strongly that posting signs will infringe on the rights of others.

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Hilary's picture

Hilary

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thanks for sharing your story, busymom.  I find myself in a similar position in this instance as I often do when a peanut allergy is being discussed.  It is as much your right to have a healthy work environment as it is another person's right to have freedom of expression (is that what I mean?) through her fragrance.

 

I don't wear scents in part because of close friends with sensitivities and in part because I can't justify the cost when I'm already using (lightly) scented products in the shower.  You can hang your coat next to mine any time!

MistsOfSpring's picture

MistsOfSpring

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Our entire school board is scent free for this reason.  Personally, I believe that more places should be scent free.  The right to breathe and live trumps the right to "smell pretty" every time.  I would say that it's every person's personal responsibility to not put others in jeopardy and that includes the wearing of scents. 

Tiger Lily's picture

Tiger Lily

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I think that a workplace should be safe for those who work there and many workplaces have gone scent free for that reason.   

 

Triggering asthma symptoms - or attacks - is not something to mess with.  Very sorry that you had that experience today Busymom. 

 

TL

 

 

Hilary's picture

Hilary

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MistsOfSpring wrote:

 The right to breathe and live trumps the right to "smell pretty" every time.

 

I don't disagree with this and I think that my post may have come across as though I think otherwise... sorry for the confusion.  I only mean that we can't protect everybody from everything.

Witch's picture

Witch

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Not really much different in substance than the issue of where you can smoke, and do others have the right to be free of your smoke.

 

We, as a society, have come to the conclusion that we can regulate whether people can expect to be free of your cigarette smoke.

MistsOfSpring's picture

MistsOfSpring

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Hilary wrote:

MistsOfSpring wrote:

 The right to breathe and live trumps the right to "smell pretty" every time.

 

I don't disagree with this and I think that my post may have come across as though I think otherwise... sorry for the confusion.  I only mean that we can't protect everybody from everything.

 

No confusion...I wasn't directing my comment to you at all.

chemgal's picture

chemgal

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 Sorry to hear this busymom.  I've gotten sinus infections in the past after my allergies have been triggered by scents.  I would appreciate scent-free, but realize it's not going to happen (other people's clothing washed in certain laundry detergents can trigger my asthma).  It drives me nuts when people pile the stuff on though!  I once had the problem where someone was scent marking everything they touched.  A bit of scent-awareness would go a long way!

Tabitha's picture

Tabitha

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Yes and sometimes we don't consider all the ways we are scented.

Body wash, shampoo. moisturizer, fabric softeners alll add their scent. I try to avoid scents as musch as possible-I work with young children with disabilities and the scents are very hard o them.

chemgal's picture

chemgal

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 Sunscreen, cosmetics, hand sanitizers, lip balm, hand soap, etc. etc. etc.  A long time ago I dated someone who used an acne product that triggered my asthma.  He didn't believe me that it was scented (there was no mention of it on the product) until he found ones that said 'unscented' at the store.  Why they would add a fragrance to an acne product when it can aggravate acne I do not know.

I use some products with scents but limit it to ones that don't really affect me and don't tend to linger.  The closest producted I have used to a perfume (something I like for the smell) in a long time is when I use coconut oil as a moisturizer.  No added ingredients, just coconut oil and mmmmm love the smell!

busymom's picture

busymom

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Beshpin wrote:

Quite honestly, it seems that you should consider where you go in public as much, if not moreso, than those who apply fragrances. Only because sometimes fragrances cannot be avoided and it's not really the responsibility of others to be aware of your health.

 

 

 

You have a great point there Beshpin.  I should avoid going out in public in case other people are wearing fragrances.  Good idea! 

Some scents cannot be avoided....like others mentioned above, shampoo, hair spray, deodorant, detergents etc.  I carry rescue inhalers with me at all time for these situations.  Yesterday was the extreme.  The fragrance was overpowering and applied heavily.  The person wearing the fragrance was unaware of the effect her perfume was having on others (it wasn't just me).

The point of this thread was to bring awareness.  It is an opportunity to inform and remind posters that their choice to apply fragrances may effect the health and well-being of others.   I am certainly not expecting everyone to stop wearing fragrances, but maybe to stop to consider for a moment, that wearing so much fragrance is unnecessary in a world where people's health may be compromised by heavy scents.

 

Beloved's picture

Beloved

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I never wear perfume or body spray, but I'm guessing that my shampoo and deodorant have some kind of a fragrance in them.

 

We have had one couple at church who don't come very often because of her inability to tolerate the perfume of others.  There is one woman who sometimes sits behind me whose perfume is so strong that we often leave church feeling slightly ill (but definitely not life threatening as is for someone with lung or severe allergies.)

 

We had an appointment at our lawyer's office and when receiving the letter confirming the time and date there was a paragraph in it that informed us scents were not allowed as there was someone in the office with extreme allergies.

 

I think in a working environment scents should be minimalized and not used if it apparent that they are causing someone health issues.

 

busymom's picture

busymom

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Thanks for all your thoughtful responses.  I do think that the vast majority of people are compassionate to those with fragrance sensitivities.  When my dad died, we included in the obituary a short note to the visitation details to please refrain from wearing fragrances.  Also the florists in town were aware not to include strong scented flowers such as lilies in the floral tributes.

 

Many of my friends and family members are conscientious about limited use of fragrances.  Do they forget?   Sure!  I myself have been known to use a new kind of shampoo that causes an asthmatic reaction.  Do I expect the world to be 100% scent free?  No!  But I am guessing that one or two readers of this thread may think to themselves "I didn't know..." or "I guess I forgot about so-and-so" and by doing so they may take steps in the future that will may make someone else's life a little easier and healthier.

 

For those of you who are aware, who do refrain from using excessive fragrance....I thank you.

SG's picture

SG

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Can people feel naked without their signature scent? Yes. Is it their right to wear it? Yes.

 

Maybe they should know why they feel so naked. Our emotions and scent and memory are tied together in the brain's limbric system..

 

For me, it has much in common with cigarette companies. Companies have researched and know how our minds work. They addict us to smells that tell our mind, be happy, be sexy, be loved, be clean.... They bottle it, box it and sell us poison. They package stuff and we fill the air and the landfills with it. They make billions and we pollute ourselves, others, the environment... we get sick and die.

 

Yes, I worry about the toxins used to make artificial scents. They are rarely tested until problems are reported and can longer be denied or avoided

 

The air we breath, the food we ingest, the stuff we absorb through our skin... the world is toxic enough without adding more.

 

Linoleum and tile, when clean, do not naturally smell like pine or citrus or lavendar.

 

Do we remember what clean smells like without artificial scent?

 

Busymom, you are right. Most people, once reminded that asthma is not bitchiness, being dramatic... and that asthma kills hundreds of Canadians each year, they act responsibly. 

 

I have not met one person who upon being told someone could die who went "oh, well".

 

The worldwide asthma rate increases should worry people. They should worry people about themselves, their children, grandchildren.....

 

Rights overlap. I have the right to buy and drive a car. I however do not have the right to run someone over who is walking on the sidewalk.

 

People have the right to buy and wear perfume. My wife, a normally controlled asthmatic, also has the right to breath.

 

gecko46's picture

gecko46

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I've noticed lately that more and more places are posting notices asking people to not wear perfumes, eg., at my Dr's office, massage therapist, etc.  which is great.

 

I too have sensitivities to strong perfumes, aftershave, tobacco, etc., busymom, because I have COPD so can sympathize with you.  Not being able to breathe properly is a very frightening experience.  I am glad you got through this experience and are feeling okay.

 

I think SG's comments above are right on with respect to our need for more awareness about the overuse of fragrances in everything around us.

I watch commercials for Febreeze and shudder because in the commercial rooms and furniture are saturated with that stuff...poisonous to most of us.

I am deeply concerned about the dramatic rate of increase in childhood asthma.

Children forced to be on steroids for the rest of their lives, with serious side effects from long-term use of these drugs.

Rowan's picture

Rowan

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I've worked in places that supposedly have no scent policies. The rule in one place was if you came in smelling of perfume or what not you were to be sent home with out pay to shower and change, if you came back still smelling of the stuff you were to be sent home with out pay the rest of the day.  These rules were something you were advised of and singed off on an agreement to obey when you were hired. The rules were never actually enforced and virtually every manager came in smelling as if they had each broken a bottle of their favored scent and poured it over their heads every day.  Nothing changed even after one lady had a near fatal allergy (or maybe asthma) attack. Even then the rules weren't actually enforced, they set up a single sation for her in a mostly unused section of the call centre so she'd be away from the perfumes most of the time. But she still had to use the common lunch areas and washrooms and sit in meetings with perfume drenched managers.

Pilgrims Progress's picture

Pilgrims Progress

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Thanks for alerting us about the danger that perfume presents to those, such as yourself, in the community, Busymom.

I don't suffer from asthma so I hadn't given it much thought. Excessive use of perfume in say public transport was just an irritation to me - not life threatening.

My Nana taught me about the use of perfume. She called it "scent" and when she took me out with her she would dab a dot on her finger and place it on a wrist and behind an ear.

"Never put too much on - men don't like it. Just enough for them to think YOU smell nice."

(Okay, I know it's sexist - but, hey, it was a long time ago!)

 

I still apply perfume in this way - and have the added bonus of remembering a much loved Nana.

busymom's picture

busymom

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Excellent point Pilgrims Progress.....putting on perfume/cologne is a part of getting dressed for a lot of people.  I understand that. 

But I agree with Nana.....don't put on too much. 

SG's picture

SG

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My wife says the sign should not be "scent-free" because that is impossible and people smell scents and think, "if they can, I can" or "if X is alright then why can't I bathe in perfume each morning?" and then they do.

 

People with perfume scents do not generally bother her anymore than people who use scented shampoo or deodrant... it is those people who bathe in the perfume or cologne and truth be told smell like someone's grandmother or paid escort. If people without health problems would be honest with "bathers", they would tell them they just plain stink. It is not appealing to anyone, but they seriously think it is. The nose loses the ability to detect scents it is always exposed to. Walk into some houses and think "How do they NOT smell that????" They are used to it. So, are perfume bathers.

 

I tell folks to just take themselves to the mall. Grab a seat in the mall, parked near an entrance to a department store cosmetics. Watch people. They cover their faces, cupping ntheir hands over their mouth and nose. They walk quickly by. They wave their hands. They make faces. That is what people do when scents are too strong or are ones they do not like. 

 

How sexy and appealling does that make someone feel? That people are covering their face or making faces behind you, trying not to breathe in, covering their face discreetly.... ?

 

Your perfume choice is not the one every person you come in contact with will even like. Some scents remind you of a jerk you dated, smell like your Nana.... I once had a client break down because someone's cologne triggered PTSD because they smelled like her rapist. 

 

My feeling is that health stuff aside, perfume and cologne should be for you and anyone who gets close enough to you to smell or that you want to lure in closer for a smell. Not as a darn air freshener. If they smell you before you enter the room and your smell lingers after you leave, you are about as hot and sexy as Glade or Lysol or Airwick or a StickUp.

busymom's picture

busymom

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SG wrote:

 

I tell folks to just take themselves to the mall. Grab a seat in the mall, parked near an entrance to a department store cosmetics. Watch people. They cover their faces, cupping ntheir hands over their mouth and nose. They walk quickly by. They wave their hands. They make faces. That is what people do when scents are too strong or are ones they do not like. 

 

 

OK....this is another pet peeve of mine.  I find it ridiculous that I have to walk through the cosmetics department at Shopper's Drugmart which is reeking of  fragrance to get my puffers.....by the time I get to the pharmacist I am coughing and wheezing.   Seriously!  Something is really not right about the layout of that store.    Just sayin'.........

gecko46's picture

gecko46

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Some of the stores with strongly scented soaps and candles also require wide detours....

Someone smelling of moth balls literally makes me gag.

 

Don't know if you are up to it busymom, but I'd be tempted to wear a face mask next time I went to Shopper's.  Somebody needs to get the message.

Is there another pharmacy you can use?

 

It's a bit of a contradiction these days that we have to go to HUGE drugstores that sell cosmetics, perfumes, food, etc., meanwhile we are there because we have health issues.

SG's picture

SG

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I also pay attention to lay outs of places. Go look for yourself.

 

In one place (you will be able to name the places, they all are laid out the same) the people with pictures to develop on the way home or with lottery tickets to buy or tobacco products to pick up in a hurry get the front of the place. Those who need to go to the pharmacy in a wheelchair, on crutches, with a cane, on oxygen, in pain.... they need to go all the way inside and walk by the flower area for those rushed people with anniversaries or trying to get in the good books or out of the doghouse.

 

Try the next place. The photo place or eyeglass place gets space near the doors, so too does the haircut place or the fast food outlet. Walk past the scented candles and office supplies on one side and the cosmetics and perfumes on the other as you make your way to the pharmacy area and the headache stuff and condoms are before you ever spot the pharmacy window.

 

Try another. Walk in to the onslaught of cosmetic heaven. We are one part department store, one part pharmacy and one part convenience store. We are kind enough to put greeting cards near where you wait for your prescription.

 

Try another. Cash registers by the door and aisles full of food stuff before you make your way to the pharmacy.

 

Cookie cutter lay-outs. All with the pharmacy being a jaunt.

 

Check out any pharmacy though, they are no better. Enter here and walk the whole way to the back. It is the same if you need a washroom in most places.

 

I say everyone wheels in and halfway down and aisle and yells "HELP!" If you are on crutches or walking with a cane, sit down in the aisle and say "I just can't go anymore". Ask an associate to carry your prescription to the pharmacy for you and bring it to you when it is done. Tell them all your info is in the computer. Wear a gasmask to get your prescription. I say pee and yell "clean up in aisle three".

 

 

 

 

 

Rowan's picture

Rowan

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Most places that have a pharmacy also have what they call a 'front store' that is the actual focus of the business. Grocery chains that include pharmacies and quite a lot of drug stores fall into this category.  If you don't want to have to deal with the stuff in the front store find a place that is a 'pure pharmacy'.  The only example I can think of right off the top of my head is the Medicine Shoppe.  Such stores are hard to find because it is nearly impossible for a pure pharmacy to do enough business to pay rent or tax on a store, pay their employees competative salaries, purachse office suppies, cover  the cost of ordering in drugs (yes each store has to buy their pharmacy stock from a supplier) and so forth. 

carolla's picture

carolla

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My hospital is in the midst of a 'scent free' initiative at the moment - there are posters prominently displayed.  Most (not all!) health care staff that I know do make an effort to reduce use of scented products - for reasons of allergies as stated, and also because many folks we deal with are already feeling nauseous - it's just a kindness to not add to that!

 

I agree that the 'heavily scented' folks are often oblivious - as are smokers - to the scent they emit.  I do find it pretty offensive too.

 

A practical word of caution - avoid adolescent boys & young men - the cologne & aftershave is brutal!!   My son is an offender - I just read him some of this thread!

crazyheart's picture

crazyheart

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FLOWERS AT CHURCH TOO FOR SOME FOLK.

crazyheart's picture

crazyheart

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oops didn't mean to yell.

crazyheart's picture

crazyheart

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oops didn't mean to yell.

crazyheart's picture

crazyheart

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now I have a stutter,

myst's picture

myst

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Busymom - I am sorry to hear about your experience at work. It must be so upsetting and frustrating to have to be in situations with odours that affect you so seriously.  I have sensivities to smells - not asthma or even a severe allergy - and yet I am significantly affected. SG - I am one of those who walk quickly and cover my face going into department stores such as The Bay --  I just get so annoyed with store layouts as others have mentioned.  I wish people were more aware. Personally I wish that perfume, cologne and fake scents like febreeze and glade were banned. Period.

chemgal's picture

chemgal

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 My first product on the wish list ban is ax body spray and similar products.  People need to teach the 18-early 20s guys that body spray is not a substitute for showering at the gym.  Ever smelled a university gym?  I stopped using it after I couldn't get a scent awareness policy posted there.

YouthWorker's picture

YouthWorker

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chemgal wrote:

 My first product on the wish list ban is ax body spray and similar products.  People need to teach the 18-early 20s guys that body spray is not a substitute for showering at the gym.  Ever smelled a university gym?  I stopped using it after I couldn't get a scent awareness policy posted there.

 

Try teaching the period after gym in middle school.  It's like an Axe factory explosion mixed with equal parts BO and sweat -- all contained in a small classroom with poor ventilation...

somegalfromcan's picture

somegalfromcan

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For several years our church has had a "no scents" policy - there are posters in several locations and, on occasion, a reminder is printed in the bulletin.

 

I have the opposite issue to several people who have posted here. A few years ago, due to a medication I was taking, I completely lost my sense of smell. I stopped the medication and the sense returned - but it has never been as good as it was. For me to smell something now the scent either has to be really strong or very close to my nose - therefore I'm not likely to be wearing too much, but I might not notice if the person sitting next to me was. Maybe some of the people who are wearing too much perfume, etc., like me have dulled senses of smell.

carolla's picture

carolla

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YouthWorker wrote:

Try teaching the period after gym in middle school.  It's like an Axe factory explosion mixed with equal parts BO and sweat -- all contained in a small classroom with poor ventilation...

That's hilarious YW!!  Thanks for a LOL .

Northwind's picture

Northwind

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I work in a building that is supposed to be scent-free. I am glad of that. The only problem is that when someone comes into the building wearing ten bottles of perfume, it really stands out now. I have learned to pick my battles. Some staff in the building still wear scents. They truly do not get it.

 

I am sensitive to some scents. I think the chemical ones are the ones that bother me the most. Axe is pure evil! Some of the trendiest current perfumes are also chemically based and nasty. I curl on Monday nights. There has been a woman wearing strong scent the last two Monday nights. She has been playing in the sheet next to me both times, and her scent is overpowering. If you overpower in an 8 sheet curling rink, you are wearing too much! Fortunately, I do not have asthma. It is a mere annoyance that will sometimes give me a headache or croaky throat. Actually, on the day I asked my doctor if I could get allergy testing, a woman came in wearing one of those nasty scents. By the time I was with the doctor, I was sniffling and clearing my throat. I can't even imagine what people with life threatening asthma have to endure.

 

I get annoyed when people say it is their right to wear scents. That is fine. When your behaviour impacts those around you, it is time to think a bit.

Tiger Lily's picture

Tiger Lily

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I have asthma and scents (perfume, aftershave, scented candles etc.) are one trigger.  One of my pet peeves - and I realize that this is beyond my control - is living in an apartment building and sharing a laundry room with many other people.  Strongly scented fabric softener and dryer sheets are kind of the norm.  Obviously I understand that I can't control what other people choose to put in their laundry.  It's their home too.  Just commenting that it's a frustrating reality.  The scent in the laundry room can be overpowering.

 

TL

Northwind's picture

Northwind

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I walk the dog every morning. I really dislike the smell of dryer sheets that waft through the air all of a sudden. I used to live above the laundry room in an apartment. It was open very early in the morning. I awoke on many mornings to the smell of Bounce......bleck.

 

SG's picture

SG

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We moved from a house into an apartment and quickly realized that we could not use communal machines or a laundry mat. It was not the smell of the place. It was like her using fabric sheets even if we did not. The fabric softner sheets apparently put a waxy build up in a machine (the same waxy feel they have coming out of the box). With heat the residue melts back into clothes that do not have a sheet in them. It explained her asking "did you use a dryer sheet?" (we were a new couple), her breathiness and the head to toe rash she eventually got.

 

BTW that same waxy build up piles on the lint filter. Who cares? You should. It burns up the heating unit and can place you, your family, your pets and home at risk. If you insist on using them, you need to wash the lint trap with soap. Pull it out and run just water over it and watch the water pool. Wash our lint trap if you use fabric sheets or risk a house fire.

chemgal's picture

chemgal

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 That's one of the reasons that I'm looking forward to moving in the next few months!  Everytime I do laundry my allergies act up.  I actually clean out the machines before starting a load.  I very rarely use the dryer but do use it for towels.  I don't bother with dryer sheets now.  When I'm at my parents, I use the 'free' ones, cut it in half and wipe off most of the excess stuff on it first.  I find they do help with the static.

Pinga's picture

Pinga

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 Busymom, that is just so wrong...and beshpin, you continue to astound me with your behaviour and norms...sigh..

 

I have a friend who is extremely sensitive.  It seems to impact her , not with asthma, but in her bodies responses, anti-immune type...and she is knocked out for days.

 

I am the sneezer after walking through the laundry aisle, walking into ShoppersDrugMart or the Bay.  It ticks me off that I can't get in without going through.  some aren't so bad, i can skirt (?) the area, others I just don't get into as you have to walk down an aisle of perfumes.

 

maybe we need a program of awareness with drug stores.

 

 

Northwind's picture

Northwind

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I have complained to our love Shoppers Drug Mart. I was told that you can go in the out door, avoiding the perfume. I have done it, and it is easy. Most days I scoot through the perfume section quickly. If I have a cold or something, and my respiratory system is over reactive, I go in the out door.

 

More and more things are scented these days. I don't know why that is. It has become more difficult to get scent-free items. So, I am using laundry products from the health food store, called Nature Clean, or something like that. I use those balls in the dryer and that helps somewhat.

 

chemgal's picture

chemgal

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 I haven't really had a problem with shopper's drug mart (or similar stores like london drugs).  The bay and sears are brutal though!  It's often difficult to bypass their perfume sections because they are placed right in the middle, in a path to get back to the mall and by the elevators.  The absolute worst is pier one.  They should have a warning on their door!  At least the store is easy to avoid, I just don't shop there!

 

I can usually avoid the cleaning aisles by getting someone else to pick that kind of stuff up for me!

lastpointe's picture

lastpointe

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I would love it if shoppers reorganized with the pharmacy counter down all one side and the products on the other side. 

 

It doesn't make sense that you need to treck to the back of the store to get medicine.

 

Most stores that i go to though do offer delivery free of charge to those who need it.  I guess that would include elderly, disabled and maybe if you can't stand the scent you could make a point by asking for free delivery.

 

 

Pilgrims Progress's picture

Pilgrims Progress

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Gotta say, apart from those unfortunate enough to suffer from severe allergies such as asthma, I'm surprised by the sensitivity shown here.

 

I think I have a solution. Don't be so clean. Ditch "cleanliness is next to Godliness" and by the time your children grow up their immune systems will function well. 

 

It's one thing to be clean - but when I walk down a supermarket aisle I think society in general is afflicted with obsessive compulsive disorder.

gecko46's picture

gecko46

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Personally, I think children today need more Vitamin D - "Dirt".

Helped kids build a healthy immune system in our parent's day.....

Pinga's picture

Pinga

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 I dont' get sick, PP

 

I do find I start to sneeze around heavy perfume whether it be in cleaning products or perfume counters.

 

If around perfume, my eyes start to water.  

 

When I was in the choir, I could not stand beside one woman, as I couldn't sing due to allergy symptoms: throat, sneezing, etc.

 

 

Busymom will attest, I am not someone who does a ton of cleaning, and yes, I have eaten my share of dirt.  I think it is my body reacting to "too much" .  Part of it is likely that this area doesn't have the best air quality, due to the Grand River valley carrying junk .   We go from good to moderate throughout the year.

Pilgrims Progress's picture

Pilgrims Progress

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Pinga wrote:

 I dont' get sick, PP

 

I do find I start to sneeze around heavy perfume whether it be in cleaning products or perfume counters.

 

If around perfume, my eyes start to water.  

 

Pinga,

You're a "woos" - a word my grandson uses.

 

Possum, don't be so precious - mild allergies are just part of life.

 

I went for a surf a few days ago and got dumped.

For those of you who shiver in northern climes - getting "dumped" resembles being in the spin cycle of a washing machine.

You land on the beach with sand reaching places you didn't know existed.

Whatever was in the water gave me allergic rhinitis - all next day whenever I bent my head my nose ran like a tap....................

 

Fair enough about moving in the choir though - you are there to sing, not sneeze, the hymns.  

crazyheart's picture

crazyheart

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Between the Sheets ( but not dryer fabric sheets. )

Pinga's picture

Pinga

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 PP, but I get that...I get that there are season when I drive down a road, I will be allergic to the trees in bloom, or that maple trees in bud outside my window cause me to sneeze.

 

 

But, why should I have to abide by chemically imposed allergies due to massive amounts of perfume??  Why do drugstores need to put them at the entrance?  If I want perfume, I can go get it, but why right at the front of the store.

 

I do think this is ridiculous...and to be honest, I don't find it being a "woos", which is a word we use.  I also know people such as BusyMom and my friend, who are significantly impacted...so...I am made aware that my minor "this is gross", "achoo-achoo" is much heavier for them.

Pilgrims Progress's picture

Pilgrims Progress

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Pinga wrote:

 But, why should I have to abide by chemically imposed allergies due to massive amounts of perfume??  Why do drugstores need to put them at the entrance?  If I want perfume, I can go get it, but why right at the front of the store.

 

Why?

Refer to my earlier post.  We are a society obsessed with cleanliness and smelling "nice". The store wouldn't be able to sell them if there wasn't the demand.

That's precisely the reason the drugstores place them at the entrance - because they know from their sales that's what attracts the customers.

We (collectively) are the problem.

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Pinga

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 wait, by the same logic, you would say that the inclusion of nuts in products without labelling is acceptable because we like nuts.

 

we have made it through that, with quality labelling and now, nutfree products, which in turn has developed its own marketing products.

 

I would argue that the perfume industry and chemical industry have created the market through ads...just as "diet" products have created a maret..and other items; however, you are correct in stating that we have bought into the commercials which emphasize scent.

 

the question is though, are you stating that we should not attempt to influence the location of said products in stores to do least harm to those with serious allergies and or sensitivities?

Pilgrims Progress's picture

Pilgrims Progress

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Pinga,

We might have the same maiden name in real life - but on this we seem to be inhabiting a parallel universe. 

 

Re the nut issue - as this can be life threatening, of course it should be labelled.

 

I know this is anecdotal, and thus doesn't qualify as evidence, but when I was a child I didn't know anyone that couldn't eat nuts.

But these days, one of my granddaughters had a nut allergy - which thankfully, she seems to have overcome.

Is this other's experience also?  If so, why?

 

As to the question of trying to influence the location of products that cause serious harm - the most effective influence is to stop buying the products.

Perhaps if you asked to speak to the chemist - and he was prepared to put profit behind his medical ethics - you could succeed?

Go for it - by all means.

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