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Jeffery's picture

Jeffery

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The Lord's Prayer -- how does your church use it?

Just curious about the various practices of churches wrt the Lord's Prayer. The church I grew up in rarely used it. I think I was likely 14 before I even understood the concept of the Lord's Prayer (despite having John 3:16 memorized at 5). I guess the Lord's Prayer, like the cross, was too iconic for our extremely iconoclastic church.

My current church we say it at pretty much ever service. Actually we usually sing it -- wish I knew the name of the tune we use, as it is very enjoyable.

I'm curious what other churches do. Does the UCC say it every week? Do some some congregations sing it? What does your church do (UCC or not)?

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Jeffery's picture

Jeffery

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once more around the prayer beads.

sighsnootles's picture

sighsnootles

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we say it after the 'prayers of the people' during our sunday services.

cjms's picture

cjms

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The Lord's prayer is used in a variety of ways in the church I attend. It is not recited every week. Sometimes it is the "traditional" UCC version, sometimes it is sung (there is a really nice version in Voice United) and sometimes it is paraphrased in a variety of liturgal ways.

Cathi

lastpointe's picture

lastpointe

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WE sing it, a couple of different tunes, both in the Voices United book.

YOUCANDOIT's picture

YOUCANDOIT

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Every week. For some reason they refuse to put a page number in the bulletin so newcomers can read along and join in if they like. I used to go to a Presbyterian church where we often sang it. I miss the musical version.

crazyheart's picture

crazyheart

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We say it after prayers of the people; sing it, but one of my favorite ways is to say it repetively. The leader say "Our father who art in heaven" and the congregation repeat it. This is particularly helpful in slowing the prayer down so that people think about the words. I have seen ministers recite it like they were off to the races.
It is also a learning experience for children. They do not feel left out when this prayer is said this way. Some kids (and adults) can't read and kids don't learn it in school anymore.

Because it is such an universal prayer, even strangers and the unchurched feel comfortable. It is confort food to them in a service that might be quite intimidating.

MonAsksIt's picture

MonAsksIt

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We have an inclusive version I love, "Our Father, Our Mother, Loving God in Whom is Heaven" that our choir pianist wrote a lovely arrangement for. We also do "Eternal Spirit, Earth Bearer" from Voices United, and of course the old one we've memorized, as well as the sung versions in Voices. We use them fairly regularly in rotation but not necessarily every Sunday (I like that 60's rock version myself). I find the more we use inclusive language, the more I don't like sticking to the old one unless I under my breath mutter an added mother, which throws me off everyone else's rhythm. C'est la vie, I guess. And usually as a closure to the Prayers of the People, before baptisms, confirmations and communion.

seeler's picture

seeler

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As far back as I can remember we always recited the Lord's Prayer as part of the worship service - usually after the Prayers of the People, although one minister had it earlier in the service before the children went out to Sunday School. Our present minister insists on using one of several newer paraphrases, some that are barely recognizable, contrary to the wishes of the worship committee that feels that the Lord's Prayer in its common form is preferable. We would not object to a newer version say once a month.
I have also participated in worship where it was occasionally sung and thought it beautiful.
Printed in the bulletin? We have sometimes done that. Of course when the version keeps changing it has to be printed every week.

MonAsksIt's picture

MonAsksIt

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Using a variety allows us to look at the whole prayer with new eyes - when we recited the old one every service, it became a thing of rote habit, like wearing a comfortable old shoe that one scarcely noticed. The newer versions may pinch a little, but they keep our minds from falling asleep mid prayer. It also broadens our understanding of it - give us our daily bread isn't terribly exciting in the 21st century when we don't have to spend hours baking, rising, pinching, kneeding, but give us that which we need to sustain us could be anything from the vegitarian spaghetti for supper to the hugs of a child. That adds meaning in my view.

RevJamesMurray's picture

RevJamesMurray

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We use it every week. We alternate between singing it and saying it. We use the old chant melody (#960 in Voices United- we always put in the number). I love the David Haas #959 contemporary setting, but my organist doesn't. We have it right after the opening prayer which is either a prayer of approach or confession. We do it early so our children hear it and have a chance to learn it. Leaving it later in the service they aren't there to hear it.

xmaritimer's picture

xmaritimer

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Our church says the Lord's Prayer every Sunday -or i should say switches from singing it to saying it. Personally --I hate singing it! Love saying it! But that's just me!

Elis's picture

Elis

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Monaskit - can you post your inclusive Lord's Prayer. I love to read other versions.

We say the Lord's Prayer every Sunday (often we sing it) and I really like the fact that we all say/sing it together. I also use it every morning when I pray but I generally say to my God
Our Father and Mother
Who are in Heaven and all places
Hallowed all the names thy go by
Thy kingdom has come
Let your will be done on earth
Give us today our daily bread
And forgive us our trespasses
As we forgive those who sin against us
For thine is the kingdom
You are the Power and the Glory
Forever and Ever
Amen

MonAsksIt's picture

MonAsksIt

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Here they are, thanks to our marvelous church administrator!

The Lord's Prayer (Sung)

Our Father, our Mother, loving God in whom is heaven:

may your name be made holy,

may your reign come,

may your will be done on earth as it is in heaven.

Give us today the bread we need;

and forgive us our debts,

as we have forgiven our debtors;

and do not put us to the test,

but free us from evil.

For yours is the dominion, and the power and the glory forever. Amen.

(United Church of Christ (USA), 1995, adapted. Music by Wendy Edey)

VU 916 (b) A Paraphrase of Jesus' Prayer

Eternal Spirit,

Earth-maker, Pain-bearer, Life-giver,

Source of all that is and that shall be.

Father and Mother of us all,

Loving God, in whom is heaven:

The hallowing of your name echo through the universe!

The way of your justice be followed by peoples of the world!

Your heavenly will be done by all created beings!

Your commonwealth of peace and freedom sustain our hope and come on earth.

With the bread we need for today, feed us.

In the hurts we absorb from one another, forgive us.

In times of temptation and test, spare us.

From the grip of all that is evil, free us.

For you reign in the glory of the power that is love,

Now and forever. Amen.

Pinga's picture

Pinga

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We sing it almost every Sunday (VU 959), right at the time of Prayers of the People

For those who chaff at the words, Creator can be switched for Father with the very same rhythym, and the majority of people around you won't even notice.

Sometimes it is moved to the children's time, so that they can learn it, too.

Elis's picture

Elis

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Mon both of those are wonderful. I especially like the second one. Thank you for posting them. Elis

RevJamesMurray's picture

RevJamesMurray

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jeffrey in his bump mentioned once more around the prayer beads. Do you use them? what kind?
I was recently introduced to anglican rosary prayer beads. It is simpler than the Catholic Rosary. The anglican rosary has four sets of seven beads, interspersed by four larger beads. There are lots of different variations on the prayers you can use with it, from Julian of Norwich, celtic, Anglican prayer office, or make up your own.

http://fullcirclebeads.com/symbolism.html
the prayers page on this site also gives examples of prayers you can use.
I made mine up with beads from the dollar store. The local Anglican book room has them for around $10 in olive wood beads from Israel.

All 4 Him's picture

All 4 Him

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Say it every Sunday after the Prayers of the People.

I remember going to a sister church once last year for a big city-wide youth presentation and I was sitting with some friends from my church and another sister church when the congregation started singing the Lord's Prayer. It COMPLETELY threw me; I remember thinking these people were completely wacky and I could not for the life of me remember the prayer simply because a tune had been added to it. Then, in the middle of it, one of the teens from that congregation lifted his head, saw this group of us sitting in complete silence with our mouths shut, and jabbed each of us and said, "Why are you not singing? You HAVE to sing the prayer!" So we all just looked at each other, folded our arms and shut our mouths more firmly. I don't think this guy realized that it was actually possible to recite the Lord's Prayer WITHOUT putting it to music...

RevJamesMurray's picture

RevJamesMurray

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I think if a church is going to sing it, they should at least note in the order of service where people can find the melody so they can all sing along. To assume that everyone knows it is to clearly draw the line between those who are insiders and those who are not.

MonAsksIt's picture

MonAsksIt

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We had a new version read at our Northern presbyteries conference meeting tonight - I can't find it on line, but it's from a book called Bread of Tomorrow, and is called the Pilgrim's Prayer, with a definate Celtic slant. It was part of a Celtic-themed worship, which I just loved, and we got paper copies of the labyrinth to use instead of a sermon time, and I just loved it (of course!!!).

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