carolla's picture

carolla

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Anybody got FIBE TV?

Just wondering if any of you use FIBE TV - via Bell?  I'm thinking about it, seems like it might be economical to bundle it.  But naturally Rogers (their main cable competitor in this area) advertises that using it will drastically slow one's internet speed  if the TV is used simultaneously.  Is this true?  Bell naturally says not true.   Anybody with actual experience?   Or opinions from our well informed tech folks?

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Mendalla's picture

Mendalla

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Haven't looked into it yet, Carolla, because *sob* we don't have even have Fibe Internet in our neighbourhood yet. If we did, I might not be contemplating moving my Internet service to Rogers (who I hate but neighbours who have it are getting better performance that I am on old-style Bell High Speed). If I hear anything, I'll pass it on. I am liking Bell better these days. Their telephone reps are actually helpful and competent now and the web portal that I use to manage my personal account (my phone, Internet, and satellite TV are basically all under one account using their OneBill system) is quite good. Perhaps the s***ty customer service of the past finally pissed off enough customers that they've changed their SOP.

 

Mendalla

 

carolla's picture

carolla

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I've had pretty good customer service lately too Mendalla!  One poor young guy called me recently &  had a very loooong conversation with me trying to understand all the options he was proposing to 'save me money' - I must say he was very patient and pleasant, and in the end I think I did well with my service improvements!

carolla's picture

carolla

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just a little nudge up the list ... any thoughts out there?

SG's picture

SG

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carolla, I do not know where you live, but my wife's employer found out fibre optic can mean a lot or a little.

 

Signals sent through fibre optic cables means what we think of as fibre optic. "Fibre optic" meaning signals through old telephone lines often 50 years old is not quite the same.

 

Very few Canadians have fibre optic cables to the home. That said, friends of ours in Atlantic Canada have it but they put up with their neighbourhood being torn up to put it in.

 

If I am not mistaken, what they are offering Internet television (some call it IPTV or VDSL). It will be internet service that comes over the same wires (copper) that DSL has. No matter how fast the provider gets it will hit a funnel coming into those wires.

 

Now, all that said, Fibe TV you get what 25 Mbps? With the TV off it will  right up there. With the TV on it will slow down a bit (as it redirects some of the bandwidth to TV) but it is negligible... It would only drop to the 6Mbps devoted to internet if you were PVRing every program possible and watching every TV in the house. LOL
 

What are you on now and what kind of speeds do you have? What speeds do you need or want? Is it a surfing house or a downloading house?

 

Then, decide based on that and cost....

 

myst's picture

myst

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carolla, last summer we switched to Telus Optik tv (I would assume it's similar to Bell Fibe). Before signing up we researched and read some reviews (or people's assumptions) that the internet could be slowed with the tv use. Perhaps this was true a few years ago, but recent reports suggested that this was not an issue and we have not found it to be an issue at all. Not that I like to admit how much techo stuff gets used in our home - but we often have a few computers in use while someone else is watching tv. We are very happy with the fibre optik tv and have had no problems or concerns.

Mendalla's picture

Mendalla

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It's all going to come down to bandwidth (basically means "speed" in IT lingo). On a DSL connection like the one I have, watching Netflix or even Youtube can cause a significant bandwidth hit (and I'm not even watching Netflix HD yet since we watch it on a Wii). For instance, I can't watch Youtube at resolutions higher than 480p. My connection bogs down completely.

 

On fibre (which has much higher bandwidth) with a service that's designed specifically to run over that fibre like Fibe TV, I'd expect that the impact would be minimal. In fact, if you're getting anywhere near the advertised speeds for Fibe, even Netflix and Youtube HD shouldn't be slowing you down too much.

 

Mendalla

 

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